Feedipedia
Animal feed resources information system
Feedipedia
Feedipedia

Alyce clover (Alysicarpus vaginalis)

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This datasheet is pending revision and updating; its contents are currently derived from FAO's Animal Feed Resources Information System (1991-2002) and from Bo Göhl's Tropical Feeds (1976-1982).

Datasheet

Description
Click on the "Nutritional aspects" tab for recommendations for ruminants, pigs, poultry, rabbits, horses, fish and crustaceans
Common names 

Alyce clover, trèfle à une feuille, buffalo clover, one leaf clover, trebol alicia, pannata

Synonyms 

Alysicarpus nummularifolius sensu auct., Alysicarpus nummularifolius (L.) DC., Alysicarpus nummularifolius (L.) DC. var. angustatus Ohwi, Alysicarpus vaginalis (L.) DC. var. diversifolius Chun, Alysicarpus vaginalis (L.) DC. var. nummularifolius Miq., Hedysarum cylindricum Poir., Hedysarum vaginale L.

Taxonomic information 

Alyce clover is also used for Alysicarpus ovalifolius.

Feed categories 
Description 

Erect or spreading perennial or annual up to 1 m high. Orange/pink/purple standards. The leaves are unifoliate, broadly oval on short stalks. Pods 1.2-2.5 cm long, not constricted. Generally now regarded as unsuitable for cultivation but has naturalized.

Distribution 

It is the best-known cultivated species in India and Sri Lanka but mainly in Latin America and Florida. Considered an important cultivated legume in Bolivia where it regenerates easily from fallen seed.

Forage management 

Does not tolerate wet lands and grows poorly on low-fertility soils. Susceptible to root-knot nematodes.12.5 t DM/ha obtained in mixture with Brachiaria brizantha with N and P fertilizer in Sri Lanka, and also with B. dystacha and Paspalum dilatatum. Grown in Florida with Digitaria decumbens but found to be one of the lower yielding legumes, although yielded 8.5 t/ha compared to 5.2 t/ha for grass alone.

Nutritional aspects
Ruminants 

Well liked by cattle and horses. Often grown as a summer annual for hay or pasture as a substitute for lucerne. Palatable with the advantage over introduced temperate legumes of not causing bloat in cows.

Nutritional tables
Tables of chemical composition and nutritional value 

Avg: average or predicted value; SD: standard deviation; Min: minimum value; Max: maximum value; Nb: number of values (samples) used

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This datasheet is pending revision and updating; its contents are currently derived from FAO's Animal Feed Resources Information System (1991-2002) and from Bo Göhl's Tropical Feeds (1976-1982).

Main analysis Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb
Dry matter % as fed 23.8 1
Crude protein % DM 16.3 3.4 12.1 24.0 9
Crude fibre % DM 33.6 5.0 27.9 39.9 6
NDF % DM 68.8 6.3 37.2 68.8 4 *
ADF % DM 39.3 *
Lignin % DM 5.2 *
Ether extract % DM 3.7 1.8 2.3 6.3 4
Ash % DM 7.9 2.4 4.9 11.0 6
Gross energy MJ/kg DM 19.2 *
 
Minerals Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb
Calcium g/kg DM 13.5 7.0 5.2 24.4 5
Phosphorus g/kg DM 2.8 0.8 1.7 4.0 5
Potassium g/kg DM 11.9 7.6 3.9 22.7 5
Sodium g/kg DM 0.6 0.4 0.8 2
Magnesium g/kg DM 4.3 1.5 3.4 6.5 4
 
Ruminant nutritive values Unit Avg SD Min Max Nb
OM digestibility, Ruminant % 61.6 *
Energy digestibility, ruminants % 58.9 *
DE ruminants MJ/kg DM 11.3 *
ME ruminants MJ/kg DM 8.9 *

The asterisk * indicates that the average value was obtained by an equation.

References

Bhannasiri, 1970; Brink et al., 1988; CIRAD, 1991; Holm, 1971; Nasrullah et al., 2003

Last updated on 24/10/2012 00:43:37

References
Datasheet citation 

DATASHEET UNDER CONSTRUCTION. DO NOT QUOTE. http://www.feedipedia.org/node/333 Last updated on March 1, 2012, 17:53

Image credits 
Share this