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Reddy et al., 2008. Livest. Res. Rural Dev., 20 (5): 77

Document reference 
Reddy, D. V. ; Elanchezhian, N., 2008. Evaluation of tropical tree leaves as ruminant feedstuff based on cell contents, cell wall fractions and polyphenolic compounds. Livest. Res. Rural Dev., 20 (5): 77
Abstract 

Seven tropical tree leaves were analysed for proximate principles, cell wall fractions on organic matter basis, protein content of NDF and ADF, .non-fibre carbohydrates, calcium and phosphorus, total phenolics, total tannins, condensed tannins and B3 slowly rumen degraded protein content. These trees were Acacia auriculiformis (Australian wattle), cashewnut (Anacardium occidentale), Gliricidia sepium, jack (Artocarpus heterophyllus), Sesbania grandiflora, subabul (Leucaena leucocephala) and yellow gold mohur or copper-pod tree (Peltophorum ferrugineum). Our objective was to use certain discerning chemical constituents (protein, phenolics, ADL, B3) to evaluate these tree leaves for their potential as ruminant feedstuff. The differences between NDF and NDFom (Table 2) reflected the ash content from fibre in NDF analysis, which ranges from 0.71 in case of subabul to 2.93% for acacia leaves. Similarly ash from fibre in ADF analysis ranged between 1.47 in case of jack and sesbania leaves and 2.27% in cashewnut leaves. NFC was calculated in two ways as 100 minus NDF, protein, lipids and ash in a feedstuff with or without NDF corrected for protein. The NFC values derived with NDF corrected for protein are appropriate. Total phenolics of acacia, cashewnut, gliricidia, jack, sesbania, subabul and yellow gold mohur, respectively, were 13.4, 20.3, 5.6, 15.6, 9.4, 11.3 and 12.5%. Sesbania, subabul and gliricidia were kept in best category in view of their higher protein, lower lignin and phenolics, while acacia, jack and yellow gold mohur in the next best category. Cashewnut leaves were kept in the last category in view of relatively lower protein and higher lignin and phenolics, which were responsible for the low nutritive value of them in goats. However, considering the beneficial effect of condensed tannins in protecting protein from rumen degradation, cashewnut or other leaves may be incorporated at appropriate level in the ruminant diet.

Document description 

Seven tropical tree leaves were analysed for proximate principles, cell wall fractions on organic matter basis, protein content of NDF and ADF, non-fibre carbohydrates, calcium and phosphorus, total phenolics, total tannins, condensed tannins and B3 slowly rumen degraded protein content. These trees were Acacia auriculiformis (Australian wattle), cashewnut ( Anacardium occidentale), Gliricidia sepium, jack ( Artocarpus heterophyllus), Sesbania grandiflora, subabul ( Leucaena leucocephala) and yellow gold mohur or copper-pod tree ( Peltophorim ferrugineum). Our objective was to use certain discerning chemical constituents (protein, phenolics, ADL, B3) to evaluate these tree leaves for their potential as ruminant feedstuff. The differences between NDF and NDFom reflected the ash content from fibre in NDF analysis, which ranges from 0.71 in case of subabul to 2.93% for acacia leaves. Similarly ash from fibre in ADF analysis ranged between 1.47 in case of jack and sesbania leaves and 2.27% in cashewnut leaves. NFC was calculated in two ways as 100 minus NDF, protein, lipids and ash in a feedstuff with or without NDF corrected for protein. The NFC values derived with NDF corrected for protein are appropriate. Total phenolics of acacia, cashewnut, gliricidia, jack, sesbania, subabul and yellow gold mohur, respectively, were 13.4, 20.3, 5.6, 15.6, 9.4, 11.3 and 12.5%. Sesbania, subabul and gliricidia were kept in best category in view of their higher protein, lower lignin and phenolics, while acacia, jack and yellow gold mohur in the next best category. Cashewnut leaves were kept in the last category in view of relatively lower protein and higher lignin and phenolics, which were responsible for the low nutritive value of them in goats. However, considering the beneficial effect of condensed tannins in protecting protein from rumen degradation, cashewnut or other leaves may be incorporated at appropriate level in the ruminant diet

Citation key 
Reddy et al., 2008