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Tangtaweewipat et al., 1992. Proc. 30th Kasetsart Univ. Annual Conf., 29/01 – 1/02/1992, Bangkok, Thailand, p145-160

Document reference 
Tangtaweewipat, S.; Cheva-Isarakul, B. , 1992. Sesame meal as soybean meal substitute in poultry diets 1. Replacement pullets and Japanese laying quails. Proc. 30th Kasetsart Univ. Annual Conf., 29/01 – 1/02/1992, Bangkok, Thailand, p145-160
Alternative title 

การใช้กากงาทดแทนกากถั่วเหลืองในอาหารสัตว์ปีก 1. ไก่สาวและนกกระทาไข่

Abstract 

The potential use of sesame ipeal (SSM) as soybean meal (SBM) substitute in poultry diets has been carried out in replacement pullets (6-20 weeks of age) and Japanese quails at the first laying stage. Four hundred heads of Golden Hubbard pullets were assigned to 4 dietary treatments, each with 2 replicates. They were raised on floor pens. SSM was incorporated at 0, 5, 10 and 15% in the grower diets, containing 15 and 13% crude protein (CP) at phase I and II (6-12 and 13-20 weeks of age) respectively. All diets were adjusted to contain 3,150-3,200 kcal ME/kg. Two hundred heads of Japanese quails, aged 80 days, were allocated to 4 dietary treatments, each with 5 replicates. They were raised in group cages for 3 months, fed with 0, 10, 15 and 20% SSM in the diets containing 22% CP and 2,850 kcal ME/kg. The result revealed that feed intake of pullets decreased, especially in phase II, with the increasing level of SSM. This, inturn, resulted in a lower body weight in those groups fed with SSM as compared to the control. With the exception of the 5% incorporating level, body weight, age of pullets at 5% egg production and body uniformity within the flock were adversely affected with the increasing level of SSM. However, no significant difference in mortality rate was found among groups.
The substitute of SBM with SSM significantly decreased egg production. Re­gardless of SSM level, feed consumption decreased at 20% as compared to the control. Thus, adversely affected feed used per unit of egg production, with the exception of group 2 (fed with 10% SSM). No significant difference in egg weight and mortality rate among groups was reported.
 

Citation key 
Tangtaweewipat et al., 1992